www.trumpetdoctors.com

Friday, June 23, 2017

Please enter your search query...
 
   
 

It Hurts. What Is It?

 
 

Copyright 2017, Mark Alan Wade

Primary Author: Lewis, L.
Journal Title: Broken Embouchures: An Embouchure Handbook and Repair Guide
Date Published: 2002
Language: English
Category: Overuse Syndrome and Musculoskeletal Injuries
Key Words: embouchure medical dental overuse wind brass instrument musician
Full Citation: Lewis, Lucinda. It Hurts. What Is It? Chap. 18 in Broken Embouchures: An Embouchure Handbook and Repair Guide. New York, NY: Oscar's House Press, 2002.
Full Abstract: Acid reflux disease can contribute to mouth discomfort and hypersalivation. Prescription antacid drugs are usually effective. If hypersalivation persists, a prescription antidepressant or allergy medicine may be taken as both cause dry mouth. A small percentage of the population has an allergy to nickel, the most common metal in mouthpieces. The easiest solution is to switch to a solid sterling, gold, or plastic mouthpiece. Screw-rim mouthpieces with gold plating are also often effective. Bell's palsy is a condition in which one side of the face experiences paralysis. This condition is caused from a viral infection, possibly herpes, which affects the nucleus of the seventh cranial nerve. Recovery can take from a week to a year, and the patient may never regain 100% muscular function. Performance anxiety can produce real physical symptoms in brass players. Prescription Beta blockers are an effective way to block the negative affects of adrenaline on the body. This kind of drug must be taken with careful supervision from a doctor as it has numerous side-effects. Other brass ailments are more enigmatic, such as Burning Mouth and Burning Lip Syndrome. Both of these conditions are more common in women than in men. The symptoms are as the names of the disorders suggest. Nutritional deficiencies, referred pain, hormonal imbalances, allergies, infection, GERD, sensory neuropathies, and physiological factors may be the cause. More common mouth disorders are canker sores, chapped lips and cold sores. Canker sores are unrelated to cold sores. They are thought to be stress induced. Cracked lips can be caused from a number of factors, including: sun exposure, cold weather, dry air, allergic reactions and excessive licking of the lips. Cold sores are a manifestation of the herpes simplex virus. This virus never leaves the body after it is infected. A common cold, fever, food, food allergies, sunburn, stress or fatigue can wake the virus from its dormancy. Fibromyalgia is a painful condition with no cure. It is unclear what causes this disorder. There are two kinds of fibromyalgia: primary (affecting the whole body), and localized. Symptoms include general body aches, depression, disrupted sleep, anxiety, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, and sudden sharp pains. Women tend to suffer from primary fibromyalgia more than men, but men suffer from localized fibromyalgia more than women.